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Search Results 0 to 43 of about 44 (some duplicates have been removed)
continue the discussion on climate science now with james hanson, head of the nasa institute for space studies and author of "storms of my grandchildren." he was awarded an award named for the scientist who advised seven u.s. presidents. this is about an hour and 15 minutes. [applause] >> i interview a lot of fantastic people in this room and that does not happen very often. in 1988, nasa scientist james hansen told a congressional hearing that it was 99% certain that burning fossil fuels was heating the earth's atmosphere. the next day, a new york times headline proclaimed a "global warming has begun." decades later, dr. hansen and others are still trying to convince the united states of these basic observations. about half of american now accept the fact. 40% do not. over the next hour, we will discuss clients -- climate science and public opinion with james hansen. today, dr. hansen is receiving [applause] i've interviewed a lot of fantastic people in this room and that doesn't happen very often. welcome to climate one, a conversation about america's energy, economy and environment.
, it turned out that it was a fellow republican, the chair of the house science committee, pro- sons, pro-environmental republican who came to defend my colleagues and me in this political witch hunt by his own fellow republican. a think you'll find this among many of my colleagues and scientists today. we do our best to frame this not as a bipartisan or political issue because it should not be. it is a fact of life that it has become somewhat of a partisan political issue. but there is some evidence that there are people on the republican side of the aisle were stepping up to challenge and do something about this problem. >> we sometimes make the mistake of saying that [indiscernible] science and values can provide the same information. i think they are completely complementary. signs is able to tell us what the problem is and what the consequences are of the trees is we make. our values is what happens from the sources. a village in alaska considers it already happened. a town and a texas might think it will not happen for a few tickets are lunker. we have to bring our values and to it.
revolutionized or reimagined seven industries. he did it, isaacson says, by standing at the crossroads of science and the humanities, connecting creativity with technology, and combining leaps of imagination with feats of engineering to produce new devices that consumers hadn't even thought of. >> thank you for coming. we're gonna make some history together today. >> if you had to pick a day where it all came together, january 9, 2007, is not a bad one. jobs is in san francisco at the macworld conference in full pitchman mode as he unveils his latest product to the faithful. >> these are not three separate devices. this is one device. [cheers and applause] and we are calling it iphone. >> it is not only a remarkable achievement but a validation of everything that jobs believed in: if you made and controlled all of your own hardware and all of your own software, you could integrate all of your products and all of your content seamlessly into one digital hub. and no one but steve jobs had thought of it. >> this is something microsoft couldn't do 'cause it made software but not the hardware. it's so
. she has 51 of honorary degrees. she has been the first of everything -- the national science foundation. she was the very first black woman to get a ph.d. at and i.t.. [applause] she is an expert in medicare and medicaid and all things health. she has been called the health czar of america. the point guard over hauling the system. how about that for a job? what a powerhouse right here. so we actually have a lot of brainpower up here. all of you could have done very different things. you had a lot of choices. i would love to hear about how you ended up taking what you did. who wants to start? >> a failed of violinist. i was raised to be a musician. my mother still asks may what happened. i was always interested in politics and writing stories for the paper. it actually was complete serendipity. i was in college and was at a meeting of the naacp. we had some big issues. this was the 1960's and we heard music down the hall. it was the college radio station and i was drawn to it. i pitched in and begin programming classical music. and they needed somebody to help with the news. i
straightforward guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> we're about to say good-bye to 2012 but not before talking about some of the top legal cases of the year. for that we bring in the legal guys. avery friedman, a civil rights attorney and law professor in my hometown, cleveland, and richard herman, a new york criminal defense attorney and law professor who joins us from las vegas. hello, happy holidays to both of you. >> same to you, marty. all the best. >> you, too. >> let's talk first jerry sandusky. a few things to bring up here. as we all remember, he was the penn state assistant football coach convicted in june on 45 counts of child sex abuse. he's now serving 30 to 60 years in prison. jerry sandusky says that he has now focused or he is focused on his appeal. he's got a hearing that i believe is set for january 10th on his pretrial motions. guys, there's a newspaper in northeastern pennsylvania that says sandusky sent a handwritten note saying he is trying to endure, and there was a lo
. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: the old year ticked down today, and with it went any hope of meeting the midnight "fiscal cliff" deadline. house republicans opted not to hold any votes on the issue tonight. so-- officially, at least-- more than $600 million in tax hikes and spending cuts begin taking effect tomorrow. in the meantime, senate republicans and the white house continue working on a possible deal. . >> are running out of time. americans are still threatened with a tax hike in just a few hours. >> new year's eve morning at the capitol began with a warning from senate majority leader harry reid. after a long weekend dush -- weekend of tense negotiations vice president joe biden had spent sunday dealing directly with the sena
foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> warner: five days and counting with plenty of tit-for- tat charges, but no agreement in sight. that, in short, summed up the state of affairs in washington today as the fiscal cliff deadline loomed, january first. it would mean more than $600 billion in across-the-board tax increases and automatic spending cuts. >> come the first of this year, americans will have less income than they have today. if we go over the cliff, and it looks like that's where we're headed. >> warner: this morning, the senate's democratic majority leader, harry reid, was blunt about chances for a deal. and he blamed house speaker john boehner. just before christmas, boehner floated his so-called "plan b"-- letting taxes rise on millionaires. but faced with opp
at the embarcadero. exploratorium was one of the first hands on science exhibitions in the country. we were just there with the kids about a month ago. there is so many things to do and hands-on learning, it's the best. today is free. >> it is 4:37. we want to take advantage of mike nicco. i know one word, we need you mike. >> okay, yeah. >> for information. >> i don't have any money, what else do you want? let's talk about spare the air. poorest air quality in the santa clara valley once again, but all of us are under spare the air and possibly again tomorrow. so no burning of any type of wood. other big story, freeze warning in the north bay, mid 20s until 9:00. frost advisory for the bayshore line and santa clara valley, temperatures in the low 30s through 9:00. keep the pets in and plants protected until that time. once we get passed that, by noon mostly sunny and upper 40s. low to mid-50s by 4:00, so slightly warmer than yesterday. clouds will lead us to a chilly evening with upper 30s to mid 40s. as we head into thursday, friday and saturday, partly cloudy on thursday. slightly warmer on f
behind are hundreds of orphaned elephants. our contributing science correspondent m. sanjayan of the nature conservancy found a woman who has devoted her entire life to helping them at an elephant sanctuary in kenya. >> reporter: these orphaned elephants are getting a second chance at life thanks to their foster mother, dame daphne sheldrick. >> we tried to replicate what that baby elephant would have in the wild, the most important thing being a family. >> reporter: sheldrick has lived among elephants nearly 60 years and started the orphanage in the 1970s when killing elephants for their tusks became an international crisis. over the years, she has discovered elephants share many traits with humans: a long life-span, mourning of their dead and strong family bonds. that's led to new techniques for raising elephants in captivity. >> so we have a team of keepers that represents the elephant family that they've lost. and here in the nursery, the keepers or attendants are with the little orphans 24 hours a day because a baby elephant in a natural situation would never ever be left
't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. a body at rest tends to stay at rest... while a body in motion tends to stay in motion. staying active can actually ease arthritis symptoms. but if you have arthritis, staying active can be difficult. prescription celebrex can help relieve arthritis pain so your body can stay in motion. because just one 200mg celebrex a day can provide 24 hour relief for many with arthritis pain and inflammation. plus, in clinical studies, celebrex is proven to improve daily physical function so moving is easier. celebrex can be taken with or without food. and it's not a narcotic. you and your doctor should balance the benefits with the risks. all prescription nsaids, like celebrex, ibuprofen, naproxen, and meloxicam have the same cardiovascular warning. they all may increase the chance of heart attack or stroke, which can lead to death. this chance increases if you have heart disease or risk factors such as high blood pressure or when nsaids are taken for long periods. nsaids, including celebrex, increase the chance of serious skin or allergic r
quickly. >> the process of threat assessment is, is more of an art than a science. oftentimes you're dealing, uh, with potential enemies whose thinking is obscure or whose inner thoughts are unavailable to you and you have to read the tea leaves in trying to divine what their actions might be. >> people want to make a choice, they want to say let's focus on the current problem, less on the future. so other people say let's focus on the future and not so much on the current problem and unfortunately we don't have that option, that's just not with the role the united states plays today. >> ultimately defending the country with less money will mean rethinking what defense really is. >> the old-fashioned establishment of national security still thinks that the world is all about nation-state conflicts. so climate change doesn't rank high, energy scarcity doesn't rank high, resource generally, global health issues. even financial management after 2008 still ranks far below the sort of old-fashioned, you know, country-versus-country conflict issues. that's changing, but it's changing sl
for a world in which science fiction is rapidly becoming science fact. >> we were put here to to touch, to smell, to taste, to see and to hear the universe. that's a great role. that's a great responsibility. >> osgood: it took more than just rocket fuel to propel sally ride into orbit. as america's first woman in space, she was a role model for those who dream of shooting for the stars. earl scruggs, he aimed high. his picking elevated the five-string bang owe from second fiddle status to star of the show. ♪ (andy griffith theme). >> reporter: no doubt you remember this tune. andy griffiths' may bury recalled our own hometowns as we remember them or wish they could have been. >> if you ever come by this way again, be sure and stop by. i hope you have more time though. we don't like to see folks hurrying through like this. >> osgood: he was something of a friend, one we'll remember for a long time to come. so long, andy. ♪ at last ♪ my love has come >> osgood: we leave it to you, the great etta james to close out our tribute to those who left us in 2012. we only wish we had a bit
's chief science correspondent robert bazell who was at the hospital. good morning, robert. >> reporter: good morning, andr andrea. we don't know a lot of what's going on here. columbia university hospital is not saying much. we have a one sentence statement from hillary clinton's office which says, as you said, is being treated for a blood clot and it stemmed from a concussion she suffered a few days ago. the problem is that concussions, when they lead to blood clots, the blood clots are not usually treated with blood thinners as they say she's being treated. if she has a blood clot that occurred because she was sitting around or something, they would treat that with blood thinners and that would be fine. but there may be more to this story that we don't know. we'll have to watch it the next few days. as they say they're keeping her under observation to maek sure she's okay. andrea? >> let's hope for the best and thanks for the update, robert. >>> raising taxes on the wealthy is separating the two parties as the deadline to the fiscal cliff draws to within hours. unless aan agreement a
a great teacher of mine who lived in bulgaria. he was an initiatic science teacher, and his lecture was very profound, and i wrote these words after listening to one of his recorded lectures. he said, the ideal of the soul, the thing it asks for is neither knowledge nor light, nor happiness. the ideal of the soul is space, immensity. the one thing your soul needs is to be free, free to expand and reach out and to embrace the infinite. yes, the ideal of the soul is infinity. it is miserable when it is circumscribed and restricted. it is a fragment of the universal soul which is infinite. that's what i speak about here in this program. the need to move beyond just fitting in, the need to move past being circumscribed, the soul does not like when you get fenced in, when it is told what to do, when it's told it has limitations, when it's told it can't become that. and so many of us go through our life with these enormous limitations that we've placed upon ourselves that have been handed to us from the time that we were little boys and little girls. if you look on the
the market is doing and being ready, no matter what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] everyone deserves the gift of all day pain relief. this season, discover aleve. all day pain relief with just two pills. [ male announcer ] when diarrhea hits, kaopectate stops it fast. powerful liquid relief speeds to the source. fast. [ male announcer ] stop the uh-oh fast with kaopectate. remark able news on a story i told you about at 5:00, we had just been told that teresa nash, the mother of two missing georgia boys has been contacted by her sons. after our interview, the boys apparently called her and told her they were in austin texas. she made her plea right here on our show. >> the children, please call mommy, you know my phone number, i have taught you how to do it, if daddy doesn't have a phone, you can ask anybody you see, everybody you see has a phone, you can ask anybody, remember my number and call mommy's number, you can ask people in stores. you can ask people in the gas station, you can ask people anywhere you se
was at 5. their science is so much more superior to everybody else's when it comes to this macular degeneration, i think the stock -- buy buy buy, is going to 200. mike until nebraska? >> caller: happy new year, boo-yah, jim. >> same. >> caller: win -- >> no, i'm not convinced. i don't like these other companies that are, that started out as wireline companies to try to do more. it's not good enough. broadband, to me it's not working, you can stick with it but i don't like it. matt in new york? >> caller: boo-yah, thanks for taking my call, jim. >> what's going on? >> caller: i'm getting into stocks. i'm wondering what your opinion is on. >> which one? >> nike, nke? >> i think nike is terrific. i believe in the return in china, north america, doing terrifically. splits the stock, it's a $50 stock, i think it can go to $60. glen in virginia? >> caller: jim, i'm a long-time listener i want to thank you for helping me get back to even sometime ago. >> you're terrific for saying that, thank you so much. howky help? >> caller: i'm retired living on dividends, my favorite stock is triang
this freakish weather and all the sciences is so overwhelming about claimant count yet you don't see on the nightly news. is there a story that you wanted to grab by the scruff of the neck during her tenure at abc and say, we've got to cover this more? >> there were several. we would have discussions about. one of them was the environment and how we covered the environment. and every time we try to do a primetime special environment we wouldn't get a rating. that led, it's one of the chapters i write about, what i do not come across well. we had leonardo dicaprio india president clinton. we got killed for it. we did a primetime environmental special, and he was chairman of earth day that you and i thought he would just make an appearance. i got killed for. that was an attempt to try to cover the environment in a serious way and drive an audience. i was concerned, frankly, about our terrorism coverage. we did more terrorism coverage than others did before 9/11. jon miller went in and interviewed bin laden, trekked into the mountains in afghanistan and interviewed him. we get a primeti
whether obama is on the side with the fossil fuel industry or with science. it is a tough test in a tough fight, but i'm very glad we have allies not only from people like christian, but young people all over the country. people went through this long period of say, young people are apathetic about these issues. why are they not doing anything? it is really, really good to see them taking the lead. it is them taking the lead, not me, not 350. >> since you raised keystone xl, do you think the announcement by lisa jackson of her retirement or resignation from the environmental protection agency is partly due to her opposition to moving forward with the keystone xl? >> i don't know. this keystone thing for me has been sort of crazy from the beginning. the 20th most important, scientists in the world road the president a letter saying this is not in the country's national interest. our most important climatologist said, if you burn all that tar sands oil on top of everything else being burned, it is game over for the climate. we of indigenous people from one end of the content to the other po
is expected to cost up to $10 million. it will be built on state owned land behind the science museum of virginia. >>> coming up, we are going to hear how the redskins players are reacting. the big win against the cowboys. >>> and later this hour we'll take you inside the preparations for some of the big new year's eve parties in our area. >>> and big news about the health of president george h.w. bush. keep it here. yoceebatailein niorteuhesal yo cavg anmas u ssrrab. quitnciree aim buthacicevs se od cacae idroon henal ar twe dn, ndoc'tro yo emeba. myenstecmee tht us pnel bau ihes senhe thenme a ielveits i aoo j. because a chicken is what it eats. [ jim ] this seal verifies we feed my fresh all-natural chickens an all-vegetarian diet including corn, soybeans, and marigolds. no animal by-products. no meat and bone meal. when you put my chicken on the table, you know where it came from. that i put on my children's plate. that's why we use all-white meat, breading that is whole grain with omega-3 and no preservatives. it is my goal to make the highest quality, best-tasting nugget on th
universities and allow more education in science and mathematics in the school system which would allow more people to do research in this field. to allow more electric energy instead of so much depending on petroleum and oil. guest: about the education system. the second question is about the role of private enterprise in these technologies. education is the silver bullet and the thing that we can do most cheaply and easily to get kids excited about solving big problems. it needs to begin not in universities but at elementary and high school level education. every year we choose 35 young innovators who we believe have the greatest capacity to change the world. this year most of the 35 lived and worked in the united states, less than five had gone to elementary school in the united states. they came from china, europe, israel. we are not doing a good job in the states in making science and technology a profitable activity, where kids can commit their entire lives and careers to it. the best thing we can do is to invest in science and technology and mathematics education in our elementary and
and financing, if you look at the statistics are round or they measure the performance in mathematics, science, and reading, you can see where the problem is. today, they were in the number 27, 28, and so on. productivity generally is the x factor that accommodates for 60% of why one country grows and another does not. generally, it includes things like political dynamic, so we know what is happening there. that is not my prediction. look at this framework, capital, labor, productivity. you will see why i am incredibly bullish. in terms of capital, these economies by a large did not have the debt burden that other countries are facing right now. why is that important? these countries are not suffering from a deal leveraging problem. 60%-70% is under the age of 25. in you got there, over 50% is under the age of 15. we can talk about that once i sit down. once again, a really interesting story. they were talking about 30% increases over goods and services. in virtually all statistics, things like political improvements and freedoms, this is really essential. countries like rwanda have been ranke
. that is in the art, science times, style -- it means basically telling you how to live. when it becomes cultural criticism, it is telling you what opera to go to or whether "the nutcracker" is good. it turns out we know from surveys that people read a great deal more about health than they used to. people are reading the newspaper to find out how to take care when your elderly parents -- what happens when your foot falls asleep, if you go to a place 15,000 feet high you should take pills because somebody might drop dead, which happens to one of my colleagues. people are reading more for that. that is what they call value added journalism -- i call it how to live journalism. one thing about these extra sesections -- to sell something other than the record. -- the "times" used to have one page a week. one page a week. now think about the "times" and what it is -- it is highly different. the other thing they're doing better -- cultural criticism. i talked about with one member of the audience -- cultural criticism used to be really what might be called culture in new york. now it is every kind of c
they normally wear. it was just like a science-fiction moment. it's like, what happened to all the men? i became curious about that. because i am a reporter, you know that once you get an idea in your head and you really can't let go. as a friend of this woman in the supermarket, her name was bethany, i bumped into her and started talking. i said, what's up? are you married? she was not married. though she had a daughter. and she began to talk to me about the guy was the father of her daughter and how -- she herself was working, she was going to school to become a nurse, she was raising a child and she began to talk about things in a disparaging way. which is well we don't live with calvin because he would be another mouth to feed. that was her argument. of course, she and i had a sisterhood bonding at that moment. but i wanted to know who calvin lies. so i got his phone number and calvin and i started at become friends. what happened to these men? what's going to happen to them? i don't know if you know that old ladies home journal column, can this marriage be saved, where you try to figure out
the aging population. also in terms of quality. they measure the performance in mathematics, science, and reading and rank countries every three years. and then productivity. productivity is supposed to account for about 60% of white one country grows and another does not. how efficient we are in using capital labor and rule of law, how open the business environment is. we know what is happening there. look at the frame work and applied it to the emerging markets. i am incredibly bullish for 2013 and the years ahead. places like africa -- compared to over 100% in places like greece and italy. these countries are not suffering from the leveraging problem. 60% of the emerging world is under the age of 25. over the to% in places like uganda. there are issues with youth employment. we are talking about 30% increases. opportunity for economic growth. things like political improvement in terms of democracy and freedoms. i have to have this debate with you, bill. countries like rwanda have been ranked number 1 by the world bank as the most improved. then the closed by telling you this. 90%
on a road trip through los angeles to get to the california science center where it's now on display. and now the shuttle "atlantis" is taking its place in history without traveling anywhere. cnn's john zarrella is at the kennedy space center. hey, john. >> reporter: hey, candy. you're right, "atlantis" is really the only one of the shuttles that didn't have to take wing to get to its future museum landing site. "atlantis" in november literally just went ten miles down the road from the vehicle assembly building here to the visitor complex. for the viewers out there saying, where is it? that's it right there behind me. that is "atlantis." and it is completely wrapped in shrink wrap. why is that? because they are building the facility, the museum around the shuttle. so it's quiet here now. but i have to tell you, all day today, the workmen were just hammering and they're putting up scaffolding and they're finishing this up by july when the grand opening will be. in march, they're going to actually unwrap "atlantis" when most of the work will be done then. but you can see it's on a 45-
.s. department of agriculture, social science analyst. thank you for being with us. >> thank you for having us. >> tomorrow, we will continue looking at fiscal cliff negotiations and how americans will be affected if the deadline passes. our guest will be joseph rosenberg, followed by a look by presidential campaigning and the influence of the electoral college. then a discussion on hurricane sandy relief funding. we will be joined by dan freed iedman. all that beginning at 7:00 a.m. eastern here on c-span. ♪ >> if we turn away from the needs of others, we align ourselves with those forces which are bringing about this suffering. >> the white house is a bully pulpit and you ought to take advantage of it. >> obesity is nothing short of a public health conference. >> i think i had little antennas go up that told me when somebody had there an agenda. >> it would be a shame to waste it. >> i think they serve as a window on the past to what was going on with american women. >> she becomes the chief confidante, really any way the only one in the world he could trust. >> they were writers, journali
Search Results 0 to 43 of about 44 (some duplicates have been removed)